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A Logical Approach

Taiun Company Limited improves cost and continuity with consolidation and a new disaster-recovery solution

Taiun Company Limited improves cost and continuity with consolidation and a new disaster-recovery solution
Photo by Andrew Loiterton

Reducing Expenses

Founded in 1919, the Tokyo-headquartered Taiun specializes in all things logistics, including international ocean and airfreight services; harbor express services; International Air Transport Association assistance and customs brokerage; air-cargo consolidation; warehouse management; and storage, packaging and stock keeping.

Its customers, including such companies as Toshiba, are located in the Asia/Pacific region, primarily in China, Singapore and Taiwan. In most cases, Taiun acts a middleman between parts manufacturers and end-product producers, moving items and warehousing them for later distribution.

The company has grown quite a bit since its inception, and in 1987 opened a Hong Kong branch. It now has nine Taiun-operated facilities, including in China, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand. Its primary data center, in Hong Kong, includes two Power 520s running IBM i 6.1. Its homegrown online tracking system supports its core logistics, distribution and warehousing operations.

The latter service is perhaps the most important to the company’s bottom line. That’s in part why, according to Jeffrey Wat, Taiun’s business solutions development manager, the company purchased the Power Systems servers. “Our warehouse-management system running on Power* technology gives us a great selling point, because we can accurately keep track of our customers’ inventory for them or tie it into their systems via EDI,” Wat says. “If we do that type of computer-to-computer communications, we can easily process inventory requests as a warehouse order and pick and pack and then deliver whatever they want to them.”

Before moving to the Power systems, the company had a distributed computing environment. Four of its branch offices had older System i servers that tied into the company’s primary server in Hong Kong. But the company found that this model of computing was expensive to maintain, with IT specialists having to travel to these different branches to address any computer-related issues.

Jim Utsler, IBM Systems Magazine senior writer, has been covering the technology field for more than a decade. Jim can be reached at jjutsler@provide.net.


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